Geocycle is a worldwide leading provider of waste management services for the industrial, municipal and agricultural sectors. Our UK site based in Cauldon, Staffordshire, uses over 80 thousand tonnes of waste every year, to provide sustainable energy to the construction industry. 

 

Why waste management is important?

Nearly every industrial company generates tonnes of waste as a production process by-product. Handling this waste in a responsible and economic manner can be challenging, particularly with hazardous material. 

Geocycle provides waste management solutions to help solve these challenges. By rethinking how we deal with waste, moving from landfill disposal to recovering and recycling material as substitute fuel or raw material.

geocycle shredded tyres

How Geocycle waste management works?

Utilising existing facilities and our extensive network across Europe, we apply the proven technology of co-processing to reuse waste in a sustainable manner. The waste is then used as fuel or raw material in cement kilns for ultimate use in the construction industry. 

Geocycle co-processing completely destroys the waste through high temperatures and long resonance time with all mineral content from the waste being recycled into the final product, cement. This is compared to incineration and landfill that both leave behind a residue.

What types of waste can be used?

  • Solid Recovered Fuel
  • Shredded Tyres
  • Process Sewage Sludge
  • Waste Solvents & Liquids
  • Biomass Residues
  • Mineral Waste

Why use Geocycle in cement kilns?

Cement kilns are ideally suited for safe and sustainable management of waste through co-processing due to the high temperatures and long residence time which are more than 3” > 1100 °C. As it completely destroys the waste, the process contributes to a zero-waste future and circular economy. 

By sourcing co-processed waste that has been through a rigorous analysis, we can ensure the quality of the cement is not affected.

 
 

Resources

Geocycle brochure (pdf, 725.22 KB)

 

Geocycle explained